Department Chair, Professor, Associate Dean of Graduate Studies

Office

WCB 4015

Phone

(305) 284-3657

Email

clane@miami.edu

Christina Lane is Professor of film studies and Chair of the Department of Cinematic Arts as well as Associate Dean of Graduate Studies in the School of Communication. She received a Ph.D. in critical and cultural theory from the Radio-TV-Film Department at the University of Texas at Austin. She earned an M.A. in Women’s Studies from The Ohio State University and a B.A. in English from Mount Holyoke College.

Dr. Lane is the Edgar® Award-winning author of the book, “Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, The Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock” (Chicago Review Press, February 2020). “Phantom Lady” is a biography of Joan Harrison who started out as Alfred Hitchcock’s secretary and soon became one of his closest collaborators, earning an Oscar nomination on his first American film, Rebecca, and critically shaping his brand as the “Master of Suspense.” Joan Harrison went on to become an influential producer of film noir in Hollywood and a powerhouse producer of five television series in the 1950s and 1960s. In addition to winning the Edgar® Award, “Phantom Lady” has been nominated for an Agatha Award, an Anthony Award, and was named by Library Journal as one of the Best Books of 2020.

She has written the books “Feminist Hollywood: From Born in Flames to Point Break” (Wayne State UP, 2000) and “Magnolia” (Wiley-Blackwell Studies in Film and Television, 2011), which is the first full-length study of the Paul Thomas Anderson film. Her work has been published in Feminist Media Histories, Cinema Journal, the Quarterly Review of Film and Television, Cine-Files, Alphaville, Mississippi Quarterly, and The Journal of Popular Film and TV. She has contributed essays to various edited collections, including “The Routledge Handbook of Digital Humanities and Remix Studies;” “Hollywood Transgressor: The Films of Kathryn Bigelow;” “Contemporary American Independent Film;” “Feminism Goes to the Movies” and “Hitchcock and Adaptation.”

Dr. Lane is President of the University Film and Video Association and on the Steering Committee of Women and Film History International. She has provided commentary to such outlets as Air Mail, CrimeReads, and the Daily Mail and appeared as a featured guest speaker at the Film Forum, Queens Library, and on NPR and Turner Classic Movies.

Featured Projects

authorchristinalane.com/blog

Zigzag: Classical Hollywood Chronicles

Courses Taught

History of International Cinema
Pedagogy, Genres, National Cinemas
History of Motion Pictures
Film Directors
Women, Media, & Popular Culture
Critical Studies in American Television
Principles of Aesthetics and Analysis
Pedagogy

Research Interests

Biographers International Organization, 2020 – present.
Mystery Writers of America, 2020 – present.
Screenwriting Research Network, 2018 – present.
Sisters in Crime, 2021 – present.
Women and Film History International, 2006 – present.
Women Film Critics Circle, 2015 – present.
Women’s National Book Association, 2020 – present.

Featured Publications

“Researching Janet Dean: Perspectives on Female Collaboration in Television Production.” Alphaville: Journal of Film and Screen Media, Archival Opportunities and Absences in Women’s Film and Television Histories Dossier, 20, 2020, 205–212.
http://www.alphavillejournal.com/Issue20/HTML/DossierLane.html

Phantom Lady: Hollywood Producer Joan Harrison, The Forgotten Woman Behind Hitchcock (Chicago Review Press, February 2020)
https://www.chicagoreviewpress.com/search-results-pages-21.php?search_term=phantom+lady&advancedSearchSelect=&go=

“Carole Lombard and What Remains” (video essay) Cinefiles Eds. Vicki Callahan and Virginia Kuhn. Issue 11 2017

http://www.thecine-files.com/carole-lombard/

“A Modern Marriage for the Masses: Carole Lombard, Clark Gable, and the Cultural Front,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 33.5 (January 2016).
http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/RYQgeWAIVctBUtFnAcWz/full

“Good Grief: The Cultural Work of Flightplan and the Vanishing Lady Tale,” in Culture, Trauma, Conflict: Cultural Studies Perspectives on War, Sec. Edition Ed. Nico Carpentier. (UK: Cambridge Scholars Press, 2015)
https://www.amazon.com/Culture-Trauma-Conflict-Cultural-Perspectives/dp/1443870560

“Susan Seidelman’s Contemporary Films and the Feminist Art of Self-Reinvention in a Changing Technological Landscape,” in Badley, Linda, Claire Perkins, and Michele Schreiber. 2017. Indie reframed: women’s filmmaking and contemporary American independent cinema. (UK: Edinburgh UP, 2017)
http://edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com/view/10.3366/edinburgh/9781474403924.001.0001/upso-9781474403924-chapter-005

with Jo Botting. “‘What Did Alma Think?’: Continuity, Writing, Editing, and Adaptation,” Hitchcock and Adapatation Ed. Mark Osteen. (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014)
https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442230873/Hitchcock-and-Adaptation-On-the-Page-and-Screen

“Kathryn Bigelow.” In Oxford Bibliographies in Cinema and Media Studies, ed. Krin Gabbard. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013), online.

with Nicole Richter. “The Feminist Poetics of Sofia Coppola: Spectacle and Self-Consciousness in Marie Antoinette,” Feminism at the Movies: Understanding Gender in Contemporary Popular Cinema, eds. Hilary Radner and Rebecca Stringer. (New York: Routledge, 2011), 189-202.

Magnolia (Wiley-Blackwell Series in Film and Television) (London, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011).
https://www.amazon.com/Magnolia-Christina-Lane/dp/1405184612/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1513952726&sr=1-1&keywords=magnolia+christina+lane

“Sally Field and Goldie Hawn: Feminism, Postfeminism, and Cactus Flower Politics,” Acting for America: Movie Stars of the 1980s, ed. Robert T. Eberwein. (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2010), 180-200.

“Forging Florida’s Sun Screen: Architecture, Film, Orientalism, and the Settling of America’s Final Frontier.” Mississippi Quarterly 63.3-4 (Summer-Fall 2010): 373-398.

“Just Another Girl Outside the Neo-Indie.” Contemporary American Independent Film: From the Margins to the Mainstream, eds. Christine Holmlund and Justin Wyatt. (New York: Routledge, 2004), 193-210.

“The Strange Days of Kathryn Bigelow and James Cameron.” The Films of Kathryn Bigelow: Hollywood Transgressor, eds. Deborah Jermyn and Sean Redmond. (New York and London: Columbia University Press/Wallflower Press, 2003), 178-197.

“Stepping Out from Behind the Grand Silhouette: Joan Harrison’s Films of the 1940s,” Authorship and Film, eds. David E. Gerstner and Janet Staiger. (NY: Routledge, 2003), 97-116.

Feminist Hollywood: From Born in Flames to Point Break (Detroit, MI: Wayne State University Press, 2000).
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0814329225/sr=8-1/qid=1513952678/ref=olp_product_details?_encoding=UTF8&me=&qid=1513952678&sr=8-1